Hosted by Science Oxford, British Science Association Oxfordshire Branch and Oxford Skeptics in the Pub

Fran Day, Professor Sunetra Gupta, Dr. Alison Woollard, Professor Suzanne Aigrain, Sally Le Page, Laura Kimpton, Dr. Sylvia McLain

When?
Tuesday, October 14 2014 at 6:30PM

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Where?

108 St Aldate's
City Centre
Oxford
OX1 1BU

Who?
Fran Day, Professor Sunetra Gupta, Dr. Alison Woollard, Professor Suzanne Aigrain, Sally Le Page, Laura Kimpton, Dr. Sylvia McLain

What's the talk about?

Join us for an evening celebrating the vital role that women have played in scientific discovery over the past two hundred years. This event is free, but please email live@scienceoxford.com to guarantee your seat.

Ada Lovelace Night commemorates the ground-breaking mathematician and writer who was known for her work on Charles Babbage’s early mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine. Her notes on the engine include what is recognised as the first algorithm intended to be carried out by a machine. Because of this, Ada is often described as the world’s first computer programmer.

The evening will feature talks by six inspirational female scientists and is hosted by particle physicist and science comedian Fran Day.

Ada Lovelace Night is an event organised in collaboration with Science Oxford, British Science Association Oxfordshire Branch and Oxford Skeptics in the Pub to highlight the importance of women such as Ada in science, technology, engineering and maths.

Join us at 6.30pm for a 7pm start and prepare for a night of scientific intrigue and plenty of laughs with Oxford’s top female scientists. This event is free but due to popularity of the event please email live@scienceoxford.com to guarantee your seat.

Our inspirational speakers

Kicking us off is Professor Sunetra Gupta, Professor of Theoretical Epidemiology at Oxford University. Professor Gupta uses mathematical models to study the population structure of pathogens, with particular reference to the infectious diseases. She has been awarded the Scientific Medal by the Zoological Society of London and the Royal Society Rosalind Franklin Award for her scientific research. She is also an award winning novelist.

Dr. Alison Woollard is a lecturer in genetics at Oxford University. With particular interest in nematode worms, Dr. Woollard’s research is on the genetic similarities between all organisms. She finds the worms a source of constant fascination. It represents the “perfect compromise” between simplicity and complexity, as well as having a “striking genetic similarity” to other organisms – like humans. Dr. Wollard presented the RI Christmas lecture in 2013.

Professor Suzanne Aigrain is an astrophysicist at Oxford University. Professor Aigrain works on the detection and characterisation of extrasolar planets (planets outside the solar system) with particular interest in locating small Earth-like planets and finding out how they formed.

Sally Le Page researches sexual selection, kin selection and other cool bits of evolutionary theory. She also makes Shed Science, a series of YouTube videos about the really fascinating bits of biology ranging from genetics to behaviour. Sally recently won a national short film competition run by the Guardian and OUP with her one minute video on evolution.

Laura Kimpton works at the Mathematical Institute researching mathematical mechanical modelling especially for biological applications. Laura is also a member of Marcus’ Marvellous Mathemagicians and leads a number of Maths in the City walking tours around Oxford and London.

Dr. Sylvia McLain is interested in understanding how biological processes occur in nature by looking at the atomic structure of peptides, lipids and membranes. She leads a biophysics group at the Department of Biochemistry, Oxford University by day and blogs by night. She also writes about science, science policy and philosophy of science for The Guardian.